C
geology astronomy biology chemistry physics
Science blog covering all topics of science, including geology, astronomy, biology, physics, chemistry, and more. I also occasionally post math.
via source reblog posted 26 minutes ago with 2,152 notes →
sci-universe:

Comet PanSTARRS with galaxy NGC 3319Image credit: Alessandro Falesiedi

sci-universe:

Comet PanSTARRS with galaxy NGC 3319
Image credit: Alessandro Falesiedi

via source reblog posted 54 minutes ago with 799 notes →
rachelignotofsky:

First illustration in my Women in Science series. Get one for yourself here:
https://www.etsy.com/listing/196197246/women-in-science-marie-curie

rachelignotofsky:

First illustration in my Women in Science series. Get one for yourself here:

https://www.etsy.com/listing/196197246/women-in-science-marie-curie

via source reblog posted 1 hour ago with 56 notes →
starresearch:

The radiation spectra of the giant planets at visible wavelengths photographed by Vesto M. Slipher at the Lowell Observatory in 1907

starresearch:

The radiation spectra of the giant planets at visible wavelengths photographed by Vesto M. Slipher at the Lowell Observatory in 1907

via source reblog posted 1 hour ago with 107 notes →
spacettf:

Gabriela Mistral Nebula by Astro-Tanja on Flickr.
Tramite Flickr: 4:20 Hours LRGB  For processing info read my blog: www.astrotanja.com/gabrielamistralnebula/ NGC 3324 is a star forming region at the northwest corner of the Carina Nebula. It is called the Gabriela Mistral nebula, because of the resemblance with the Nobel Prize winning Chilean poet. It’s shown in the center of this image, with Eta Carina Nebula to the left and NGC 3293 upper right.

spacettf:

Gabriela Mistral Nebula by Astro-Tanja on Flickr.

Tramite Flickr:
4:20 Hours LRGB
For processing info read my blog: www.astrotanja.com/gabrielamistralnebula/

NGC 3324 is a star forming region at the northwest corner of the Carina Nebula. It is called the Gabriela Mistral nebula, because of the resemblance with the Nobel Prize winning Chilean poet. It’s shown in the center of this image, with Eta Carina Nebula to the left and NGC 3293 upper right.

via source reblog posted 2 hours ago with 175 notes →
ifuckingloveminerals:

Enargite
Madielle Quarries, Massa, Apuan Alps, Massa-Carrara Province, Tuscany, Italy

ifuckingloveminerals:

Enargite

Madielle Quarries, Massa, Apuan Alps, Massa-Carrara Province, Tuscany, Italy

via source reblog posted 2 hours ago with 125 notes →
bijoux-et-mineraux:

Sulfur on Carrara Marble with Dolomite - Cava Colonnata, Alpi Apuane, Carrara, Massa-Carrara, Toscana, Italy

bijoux-et-mineraux:

Sulfur on Carrara Marble with Dolomite - Cava Colonnata, Alpi Apuane, Carrara, Massa-Carrara, Toscana, Italy

via source reblog posted 3 hours ago with 33 notes →
fuckyeahaquaria:

Pyramid Butterflyfish | Hemitaurichthys polylepis
(by Scott Rettig)

fuckyeahaquaria:

Pyramid Butterflyfish | Hemitaurichthys polylepis

(by Scott Rettig)

via source reblog posted 4 hours ago with 309 notes →
the-wolf-and-moon:

Unusual Globule in IC 1396

the-wolf-and-moon:

Unusual Globule in IC 1396

via source reblog posted 4 hours ago with 221 notes →
distant-traveller:

A slice of stars

The thin, glowing streak slicing across this image cuts a lonely figure, with only a few foreground stars and galaxies in the distant background for company.
However, this is all a case of perspective; lying out of frame is another nearby spiral. Together, these two galaxies make up a pair, moving through space together and keeping one another company.
The subject of this Hubble image is called NGC 3501, with NGC 3507 as its out-of-frame companion. The two galaxies look very different — another example of the importance of perspective. NGC 3501 appears edge-on, giving it an elongated and very narrow appearance. Its partner, however, looks very different indeed, appearing face-on and giving us a fantastic view of its barred swirling arms.
While similar arms may not be visible in this image of NGC 3501, this galaxy is also a spiral — although it is somewhat different from its companion. While NGC 3507 has bars cutting through its centre, NGC 3501 does not. Instead, its loosely wound spiral arms all originate from its centre. The bright gas and stars that make up these arms can be seen here glowing brightly, mottled by the dark dust lanes that trace across the galaxy.

Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA; Acknowledgement: Nick Rose

distant-traveller:

A slice of stars

The thin, glowing streak slicing across this image cuts a lonely figure, with only a few foreground stars and galaxies in the distant background for company.

However, this is all a case of perspective; lying out of frame is another nearby spiral. Together, these two galaxies make up a pair, moving through space together and keeping one another company.

The subject of this Hubble image is called NGC 3501, with NGC 3507 as its out-of-frame companion. The two galaxies look very different — another example of the importance of perspective. NGC 3501 appears edge-on, giving it an elongated and very narrow appearance. Its partner, however, looks very different indeed, appearing face-on and giving us a fantastic view of its barred swirling arms.

While similar arms may not be visible in this image of NGC 3501, this galaxy is also a spiral — although it is somewhat different from its companion. While NGC 3507 has bars cutting through its centre, NGC 3501 does not. Instead, its loosely wound spiral arms all originate from its centre. The bright gas and stars that make up these arms can be seen here glowing brightly, mottled by the dark dust lanes that trace across the galaxy.

Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA; Acknowledgement: Nick Rose

via source reblog posted 5 hours ago with 70 notes →
via source reblog posted 5 hours ago with 79 notes →
Look Out, Graphene: Boron Atoms Form Cages And Flat Sheets Like Carbon

txchnologist:

image

by Michael Keller

Chemists working in the U.S. and China say they have discovered a new molecular structure made out of boron atoms.

They believe the structure is made of 40 boron atoms that link together into a cage, which might be useful in storing hydrogen. 

"This is the first time that a boron cage has been observed experimentally," said Lai-Sheng Wang, a Brown University chemistry professor and the study’s leader. "As a chemist, finding new molecules and structures is always exciting. The fact that boron has the capacity to form this kind of structure is very interesting."

They described their work uncovering experimental evidence for the molecule, which they have called borospherene, in a recent issue of the journal Nature Chemistry.

Read More

via source reblog posted 6 hours ago with 410 notes →

  Incredible Closeup of Horsehead Nebula by Aldo Mottino

Incredible Closeup of Horsehead Nebula by Aldo Mottino

via source reblog posted 6 hours ago with 38 notes →
thelabrat1990:

Some of my favorite copper compounds (all synthesized from copper metal). From left to right: copper (II) carbonate, copper (II) sulfate pentahydrate, anhydrous copper (II) acetate, copper (II) chloride dihydrate, and anhydrous copper (II) chloride.

thelabrat1990:

Some of my favorite copper compounds (all synthesized from copper metal). From left to right: copper (II) carbonate, copper (II) sulfate pentahydrate, anhydrous copper (II) acetate, copper (II) chloride dihydrate, and anhydrous copper (II) chloride.

via source reblog posted 7 hours ago with 115 notes →
thenewenlightenmentage:

Proton Spin Mystery Gains a New Clue
Physicists long assumed a proton’s spin came from its three constituent quarks. New measurements suggest particles called gluons make a significant contribution
Protons have a constant spin that is an intrinsic particle property like mass or charge. Yet where this spin comes from is such a mystery it’s dubbed the “proton spin crisis.” Initially physicists thought a proton’s spin was the sum of the spins of its three constituent quarks. But a 1987 experiment showed that quarks can account for only a small portion of a proton’s spin, raising the question of where the rest arises. The quarks inside a proton are held together by gluons, so scientists suggested perhaps they contribute spin. That idea now has support from a pair of studies analyzing the results of proton collisions inside the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, N.Y.
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

Proton Spin Mystery Gains a New Clue

Physicists long assumed a proton’s spin came from its three constituent quarks. New measurements suggest particles called gluons make a significant contribution

Protons have a constant spin that is an intrinsic particle property like mass or charge. Yet where this spin comes from is such a mystery it’s dubbed the “proton spin crisis.” Initially physicists thought a proton’s spin was the sum of the spins of its three constituent quarks. But a 1987 experiment showed that quarks can account for only a small portion of a proton’s spin, raising the question of where the rest arises. The quarks inside a proton are held together by gluons, so scientists suggested perhaps they contribute spin. That idea now has support from a pair of studies analyzing the results of proton collisions inside the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, N.Y.

Continue Reading

via source reblog posted 7 hours ago with 8 notes →
universal-abyss:

Mysterious dance of dwarf galaxies may force a cosmic rethink

Date: July 21, 2014
Source: University of Sydney
Summary: The discovery that many small galaxies throughout the universe do not ‘swarm’ around larger ones like bees do but ‘dance’ in orderly disc-shaped orbits is a challenge to our understanding of how the universe formed and evolved. The researchers believe the answer may be hidden in some currently unknown physical process that governs how gas flows in the universe, although, as yet, there is no obvious mechanism that can guide dwarf galaxies into narrow planes.
The discovery that many small galaxies throughout the universe do not ‘swarm’ around larger ones like bees do but ‘dance’ in orderly disc-shaped orbits is a challenge to our understanding of how the universe formed and evolved.
The finding, by an international team of astronomers, including Professor Geraint Lewis from the University of Sydney’s School of Physics, is announced today in Nature.
“Early in 2013 we announced our startling discovery that half of the dwarf galaxies surrounding the Andromeda Galaxy are orbiting it in an immense plane” said Professor Lewis. “This plane is more than a million light years in diameter, but is very thin, with a width of only 300,000 light years.”
The universe contains billions of galaxies. Some, such as the Milky Way, are immense, containing hundreds of billions of stars. Most galaxies, however, are dwarfs, much smaller and with only a few billion stars.
For decades astronomers have used computer models to predict how these dwarf galaxies should orbit large galaxies. They had always found that they should be scattered randomly.
“Our Andromeda discovery did not agree with expectations, and we felt compelled to explore if it was true of other galaxies throughout the universe,” said Professor Lewis.
Using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, a remarkable resource of colour images and 3-D maps covering more than a third of the sky, the researchers dissected the properties of thousands of nearby galaxies.
“We were surprised to find that a large proportion of pairs of satellite galaxies have oppositely directed velocities if they are situated on opposite sides of their giant galaxy hosts,” said lead author Neil Ibata of the Lycée International in Strasbourg, France.
“Everywhere we looked we saw this strangely coherent coordinated motion of dwarf galaxies. From this we can extrapolate that these circular planes of dancing dwarfs are universal, seen in about 50 percent of galaxies,” said Professor Geraint Lewis.
“This is a big problem that contradicts our standard cosmological models. It challenges our understanding of how the universe works including the nature of dark matter.”
The researchers believe the answer may be hidden in some currently unknown physical process that governs how gas flows in the universe, although, as yet, there is no obvious mechanism that can guide dwarf galaxies into narrow planes.
Some experts, however, have made more radical suggestions, including bending and twisting the laws of gravity and motion. “Throwing out seemingly established laws of physics is unpalatable,” said Professor Lewis, “but if our observations of nature are pointing us in this direction, we have to keep an open mind. That’s what science is all about.”
Story Source: The above story is based on materials provided by University of Sydney. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.
Journal Reference: Neil G. Ibata, Rodrigo A. Ibata, Benoit Famaey, Geraint F. Lewis. Velocity anti-correlation of diametrically opposed galaxy satellites in the low-redshift Universe. Nature, 2014; DOI: 10.1038/nature13481
Cite This Page: MLA APA Chicago: University of Sydney. “Mysterious dance of dwarf galaxies may force a cosmic rethink.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 July 2014. .

Pic: At approximately 2.5 million light-years away, the Andromeda galaxy, or M31, is our Milky Way’s largest galactic neighbor. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Source: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140721100418.htm

universal-abyss: Ah, galaxies dance to their own beat, causing a rethink of cosmological models? Interesting.

universal-abyss:

Mysterious dance of dwarf galaxies may force a cosmic rethink

Date: July 21, 2014
Source: University of Sydney

Summary: The discovery that many small galaxies throughout the universe do not ‘swarm’ around larger ones like bees do but ‘dance’ in orderly disc-shaped orbits is a challenge to our understanding of how the universe formed and evolved. The researchers believe the answer may be hidden in some currently unknown physical process that governs how gas flows in the universe, although, as yet, there is no obvious mechanism that can guide dwarf galaxies into narrow planes.

The discovery that many small galaxies throughout the universe do not ‘swarm’ around larger ones like bees do but ‘dance’ in orderly disc-shaped orbits is a challenge to our understanding of how the universe formed and evolved.

The finding, by an international team of astronomers, including Professor Geraint Lewis from the University of Sydney’s School of Physics, is announced today in Nature.

“Early in 2013 we announced our startling discovery that half of the dwarf galaxies surrounding the Andromeda Galaxy are orbiting it in an immense plane” said Professor Lewis. “This plane is more than a million light years in diameter, but is very thin, with a width of only 300,000 light years.”

The universe contains billions of galaxies. Some, such as the Milky Way, are immense, containing hundreds of billions of stars. Most galaxies, however, are dwarfs, much smaller and with only a few billion stars.

For decades astronomers have used computer models to predict how these dwarf galaxies should orbit large galaxies. They had always found that they should be scattered randomly.

“Our Andromeda discovery did not agree with expectations, and we felt compelled to explore if it was true of other galaxies throughout the universe,” said Professor Lewis.

Using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, a remarkable resource of colour images and 3-D maps covering more than a third of the sky, the researchers dissected the properties of thousands of nearby galaxies.

“We were surprised to find that a large proportion of pairs of satellite galaxies have oppositely directed velocities if they are situated on opposite sides of their giant galaxy hosts,” said lead author Neil Ibata of the Lycée International in Strasbourg, France.

“Everywhere we looked we saw this strangely coherent coordinated motion of dwarf galaxies. From this we can extrapolate that these circular planes of dancing dwarfs are universal, seen in about 50 percent of galaxies,” said Professor Geraint Lewis.
“This is a big problem that contradicts our standard cosmological models. It challenges our understanding of how the universe works including the nature of dark matter.”

The researchers believe the answer may be hidden in some currently unknown physical process that governs how gas flows in the universe, although, as yet, there is no obvious mechanism that can guide dwarf galaxies into narrow planes.

Some experts, however, have made more radical suggestions, including bending and twisting the laws of gravity and motion. “Throwing out seemingly established laws of physics is unpalatable,” said Professor Lewis, “but if our observations of nature are pointing us in this direction, we have to keep an open mind. That’s what science is all about.”

Story Source: The above story is based on materials provided by University of Sydney. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Journal Reference: Neil G. Ibata, Rodrigo A. Ibata, Benoit Famaey, Geraint F. Lewis. Velocity anti-correlation of diametrically opposed galaxy satellites in the low-redshift Universe. Nature, 2014; DOI: 10.1038/nature13481

Cite This Page: MLA APA Chicago: University of Sydney. “Mysterious dance of dwarf galaxies may force a cosmic rethink.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 July 2014. .

Pic: At approximately 2.5 million light-years away, the Andromeda galaxy, or M31, is our Milky Way’s largest galactic neighbor. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Source: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140721100418.htm

universal-abyss: Ah, galaxies dance to their own beat, causing a rethink of cosmological models? Interesting.