C
geology astronomy biology chemistry physics
Science blog covering all topics of science, including geology, astronomy, biology, physics, chemistry, and more. I also occasionally post math.
via source reblog posted 17 hours ago with 605 notes →
ifuckingloveminerals:

Tourmaline, Lepidolite
Pederneira mine, São José da Safira, Doce valley, Minas Gerais, Brazil

ifuckingloveminerals:

Tourmaline, Lepidolite

Pederneira mine, São José da Safira, Doce valley, Minas Gerais, Brazil

via source reblog posted 21 hours ago with 325 notes →
ggeology:

Bismuth

ggeology:

Bismuth

via source reblog posted 1 day ago with 246 notes →
ifuckingloveminerals:

Pyrite, Slate

ifuckingloveminerals:

Pyrite, Slate

via source reblog posted 1 day ago with 160 notes →
neonpi:

Plane intersection!

neonpi:

Plane intersection!

via source reblog posted 1 day ago with 41,306 notes →

Doctor Who - Season 8 - Intro

#dw
via source reblog posted 1 day ago with 272 notes →
afro-dominicano:

Partial Eclipse at Moonrise by David Malin


  A partial lunar eclipse at Moonrise is photographed in a multi-exposure image from Port Hedland, Western Australia.

afro-dominicano:

Partial Eclipse at Moonrise by David Malin

A partial lunar eclipse at Moonrise is photographed in a multi-exposure image from Port Hedland, Western Australia.

via source reblog posted 1 day ago with 2,690 notes →

kevinbolk:

Wanted to a trio of famous astrophysicists as an art card set: Carl Sagan, Neil deGrasse Tyson, and Stephen Hawking.  Might do more later, but I really wanted to have these three to start. :)

via source reblog posted 1 day ago with 735 notes →
spaceexp:

Comparative Wheel Sizes of Mars Rovers

spaceexp:

Comparative Wheel Sizes of Mars Rovers

via source reblog posted 2 days ago with 472 notes →
the-wolf-and-moon:

Carina-Sagittarius spiral arm of our Milky Way galaxy

the-wolf-and-moon:

Carina-Sagittarius spiral arm of our Milky Way galaxy

via source reblog posted 2 days ago with 235 notes →
mindblowingscience:

Getting a charge out of water droplets

Last year, MIT researchers discovered that when water droplets spontaneously jump away from superhydrophobic surfaces during condensation, they can gain electric charge in the process. Now, the same team has demonstrated that this process can generate small amounts of electricity that might be used to power electronic devices.
The new findings, by postdoc Nenad Miljkovic, associate professor of mechanical engineering Evelyn Wang, and two others, are published in the journalApplied Physics Letters.
This approach could lead to devices to charge cellphones or other electronics using just the humidity in the air. As a side benefit, the system could also produce clean water.
The device itself could be simple, Miljkovic says, consisting of a series of interleaved flat metal plates. Although his initial tests involved copper plates, he says any conductive metal would do, including cheaper aluminum.

Continue Reading.

mindblowingscience:

Getting a charge out of water droplets

Last year, MIT researchers discovered that when water droplets spontaneously jump away from superhydrophobic surfaces during condensation, they can gain electric charge in the process. Now, the same team has demonstrated that this process can generate small amounts of electricity that might be used to power electronic devices.

The new findings, by postdoc Nenad Miljkovic, associate professor of mechanical engineering Evelyn Wang, and two others, are published in the journalApplied Physics Letters.

This approach could lead to devices to charge cellphones or other electronics using just the humidity in the air. As a side benefit, the system could also produce clean water.

The device itself could be simple, Miljkovic says, consisting of a series of interleaved flat metal plates. Although his initial tests involved copper plates, he says any conductive metal would do, including cheaper aluminum.

Continue Reading.

via source reblog posted 2 days ago with 30,863 notes →
theafrocentricasian:

World’s languages traced back to single African mother tongue: scientists.
New Zealand researchers have traced every human language — from English to Mandarin — back to an ancestral language spoken in Africa 50,000 to 70,000 years ago.
Scientists say they have traced the world’s 6,000 modern languages — from English to Mandarin — back to a single “mother tongue,” an ancestral language spoken in Africa 50,000 to 70,000 years ago.
New research, published in the journal Science, suggests this single ancient language resulted in human civilization — a Diaspora — as well as advances in art and hunting tool technology, and laid the groundwork for all the world’s cultures.
The research, by Quentin Atkinson from the University of Auckland in New Zealand, also found that speech evolved far earlier than previously thought. And the findings implied, though did not prove, that modern language originated only once, an issue of controversy among linguists, according to the New York Times.
Before Atkinson came up with the evidence for a single African origin of language, some scientists had argued that language evolved independently in different parts of the world.
Atkinson found that the first populations migrating from Africa laid the groundwork for all the world’s cultures by taking their single language with them. “It was the catalyst that spurred the human expansion that we all are a product of,” Atkinson said, the Wall Street Journal reported.
Atkinson traced the number distinct sounds, or phonemes — consonants, vowels and tones — in 504 world languages, finding compelling evidence that they can be traced back to a long-forgotten dialect spoken by our Stone Age ancestors, according to the Daily Mail.
Atkinson also hypothesized that languages with the most sounds would be the oldest, while those spoken by smaller breakaway groups would utilize fewer sounds as variation and complexity diminished.
The study found that some of the click-using languages of Africa have more than 100 phonemes, or sounds, whereas Hawaiian, toward the far end of the human migration route out of Africa, has only 13, the Times reported. English has about 45 phonemes.
The phoneme pattern mirrors the pattern of human genetic diversity as humans spread across the globe from sub-Saharan Africa around 70,000 years ago.
Source: http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/business-tech/science/110415/language-science-linguistics-mother-tongue-english-chinese-mandarin-africa

theafrocentricasian:

World’s languages traced back to single African mother tongue: scientists.

New Zealand researchers have traced every human language — from English to Mandarin — back to an ancestral language spoken in Africa 50,000 to 70,000 years ago.

Scientists say they have traced the world’s 6,000 modern languages — from English to Mandarin — back to a single “mother tongue,” an ancestral language spoken in Africa 50,000 to 70,000 years ago.

New research, published in the journal Science, suggests this single ancient language resulted in human civilization — a Diaspora — as well as advances in art and hunting tool technology, and laid the groundwork for all the world’s cultures.

The research, by Quentin Atkinson from the University of Auckland in New Zealand, also found that speech evolved far earlier than previously thought. And the findings implied, though did not prove, that modern language originated only once, an issue of controversy among linguists, according to the New York Times.

Before Atkinson came up with the evidence for a single African origin of language, some scientists had argued that language evolved independently in different parts of the world.

Atkinson found that the first populations migrating from Africa laid the groundwork for all the world’s cultures by taking their single language with them. “It was the catalyst that spurred the human expansion that we all are a product of,” Atkinson said, the Wall Street Journal reported.

Atkinson traced the number distinct sounds, or phonemes — consonants, vowels and tones — in 504 world languages, finding compelling evidence that they can be traced back to a long-forgotten dialect spoken by our Stone Age ancestors, according to the Daily Mail.

Atkinson also hypothesized that languages with the most sounds would be the oldest, while those spoken by smaller breakaway groups would utilize fewer sounds as variation and complexity diminished.

The study found that some of the click-using languages of Africa have more than 100 phonemes, or sounds, whereas Hawaiian, toward the far end of the human migration route out of Africa, has only 13, the Times reported. English has about 45 phonemes.

The phoneme pattern mirrors the pattern of human genetic diversity as humans spread across the globe from sub-Saharan Africa around 70,000 years ago.

Source: http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/business-tech/science/110415/language-science-linguistics-mother-tongue-english-chinese-mandarin-africa

via source reblog posted 2 days ago with 418 notes →
valentinemichaelsmith:

Cosima warm up.

valentinemichaelsmith:

Cosima warm up.

via source reblog posted 2 days ago with 4,547 notes →
did-you-kno:

If you stay up all night your body burns an extra 161 calories.   Source

did-you-kno:

If you stay up all night your body burns an extra 161 calories.   Source

via source reblog posted 2 days ago with 1,350 notes →
psych2go:

Visit psych2go.net for the sources and new articles.

psych2go:

Visit psych2go.net for the sources and new articles.

via source reblog posted 3 days ago with 100 notes →
heythereuniverse:

Aspirin crystals | wellcome images

heythereuniverse:

Aspirin crystals | wellcome images